Category: At The Checkout

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Kindness On Their Dime

| PA, USA | At The Checkout, Kind Strangers, Money

I’m in line at the dollar store, a basket full of about a dozen items. I’ve had a long day and just want to get home. There’s only one checkout lane open, and the customer in front of me asks for a few balloons that they sell and inflate there. I’m thinking, great, it’s going to take forever for the checkout person to do them. However, the customer checking out notices the line behind her and says to the checkout person to take care of me first.

I thank her, but the checkout person goes into awesome mode, simultaneously blowing up the woman’s balloons and checking out my items.

As she tells me the total, $10.12, I groan, as I’ve only got a couple of $1s and $20s and a couple of pennies. I hand her the $20, apologizing that I don’t have exact change.

Around here, the dollar stores request smaller bills, as they get inundated with $20s and can’t make proper change sometimes.

I then tell her I only had a couple of pennies, when I thought I’d had more change, and apologize again.

Then, to my surprise, the person behind me places 12 cents on the counter. And a few seconds later, the woman in front of me who was waiting for her balloons to be inflated handed me a dime.

I was weirdly flustered because I’d never been in a situation where strangers are just handing me money.

To make it fair, I went ahead and took the woman’s dime and gave the 12 cents back to the man behind me, and thanked them both profusely.

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Patience Is Its Own Reward, But I Won’t Say No To Coffee!

| Geneva, Switzerland | At The Checkout, Food & Drink, Transportation

(I’m waiting in line for my coffee in my usual coffee shop. There are two ladies in front of me. The one just before me is a very chic-dressed, unsmiling lady on the phone. She keeps getting out of the queue while talking on her phone, coming back in in front of me, looking at the display case, then out again. It gets unclear whether she’s still queuing or not. When my turn comes, she’s been gone a while. I start to order but she barges back in, without a “sorry” and orders her own food. Since she WAS there before me, I have better things to do than argue, but the barista and I exchange a look. She orders and leaves. She never let go of her phone.)

Barista: “Good afternoon! Sorry about that, and thanks for your patience.”

Me: “It’s okay. She was like those cars that don’t have their blinkers on, but you KNOW they’re going to switch lanes!”

(He agreed with me and gave me a free drink for being always smiling and pleasant! It was worth being patient for!)

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Very Full And Thankful

| Tullahoma, TN, USA | At The Checkout, Awesome, Holidays

(Today is Thanksgiving. Both my cashier and I have been worried that all our customers are going to be cranky and yell at us for all the little things that stresses out customers doing last minute shopping and that they are bound to complain about — long lines, being out of stock on some items, that sort of thing. I come back from my lunch break to see my cashier with a long line, and a shocked look on his face.)

Me: “What’s up?”

Cashier: “A customer just… she just…” *still looking surprised*

Customer: “Oh, the customer who just left just surprised him, is all. She was saying ‘Thank you so much for being open today! I really appreciate it!'”

Me: “Oh, that is nice to hear.”

Cashier: “Yeah, but then, she finished paying for her groceries, and pulled out this box of chocolates and a package of Reese’s Peanut Butter cups she had just bought, and said ‘This is for you guys, to thank you for working today!'”

(Yes, a customer was so thankful we were open, they bought us chocolates!)

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That’s How The Christmas Cookie Crumbles

| St. John's, NL, Canada | At The Checkout, Holidays

(We have many people working the registers this day as it is close to Christmas, I call out to the next customer at the same time that Coworker does. The customer looks between us before deciding to go to my coworker’s register.)

Me: *jokingly* “That’s okay; I’m not offended. I’ll just go cry in the corner.”

Customer: *at [Coworker]’s register* “Aw, do you need a cookie?”

Me: “Well, I never turn down a cookie!”

(The customer, Coworker, and I proceeded to have a funny conversation about never turning down a cookie unless you suspect it’s laced with poison. Some time later, the customer returned and handed me a box and said, “Don’t turn them down.” She had gone and bought a box of cookies from our cafe for all the cashiers to share. To that customer, thank you for being so kind and for making the holiday rush a little better for all of us!)

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Full Of Helpful

| Marion, OH, USA | At The Checkout, Family & Kids, Holidays

(I have a birth defect called Phocomelia; my arms are short and I don’t have hands, but I get by decently well. To avoid an extra stress I tend to go to the store late at night or early morning. I go late, as with four shopping days left until Christmas I know I can’t handle the extra large crowds that were made up of people who love to stare. I have gotten good at ignoring those around me unless they are in my way and in line of sight. I was putting my items on the belt and was in my own world. I hear a man and kids talking, but don’t think anything of it, until the two little girls come up to me.)

Older Girl: “Can I help?” *I am thrown off by the question, because it’s usually an adult that asks*

Me: “Sure, thank you!” *the older girl grabs the last of the items in the cart*

Younger Girl: “I didn’t get to help.”

Me: “It’s the thought that counts.” *I feel a little bad; she truly does want to help*

Their Father: “You can help her put the bags in the cart.”

(The father and girls talk, joke, and laugh while I wait to pay for my items. It’s a nice change to hear a parent interacting with the kids and keeping everything light and happy, as all the other parents I see in the store this night ignore or yell at their kids. When my items are being bagged the father tells them to help. I get one bag, the older girl gets another and then helps her little sister with the last bag.)

Me: “Thank you, girls!” *and then I thank the father*

(The father helped renew some of my faith in the future generations. Not only did the girls happily help, but they didn’t stare. They looked a little, but I wouldn’t expect anything less from younger kids. To the father: Thank you so much! I’m used to doing things on my own, but to be offered help when I’m obviously tired and struggling means so much to me, especially after waiting to see if I had things handled or was struggling. And the fact that you are raising your girls to be respectful to others is heartwarming.)

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