Category: Family & Kids

Turn Up For That Red-Letter Day

| Wheaton, IL, USA | Awesome, Employees, Family & Kids

(I was adopted as a baby, but never had much curiosity about my birth family. At 27, I begin to have some medical issues, and it soon becomes apparent that I will need to make contact, and maybe my curiosity wins out a little. I find the address of my birth mother and decide to write her a letter. It sits on my kitchen table for three days before I feel like I have the courage to mail it. I finally decide to try, and grab it as I go out the door. I get to the vestibule of my apartment building, and our mail lady is there, filling boxes.)

Mail Lady: “Hey, A6, how’s it going?”

(Even though we’ve only lived there 6 months, she is the sweetest, friendliest woman and always jokingly calls people by their apartment numbers.)

Me: “Hi! It’s um… going good!”

Mail Lady: “Nothing good for you today, it looks like probably a bunch of junk… Oh, hey, have you got a letter there? I can take it!”

(She holds her hand out for it, but I don’t give it up. I promptly start crying. She smiles gently.)

Mail Lady: “Not quite ready?”

Me: “It’s… it’s a letter to my birth mother. I was going to go to the mailbox to see if I was strong enough to drop it in.”

(She gently puts her hand on mine.)

Mail Lady: “Now you don’t have to.”

(I look at her uncertainly.)

Mail Lady: “I’m a sign, A6. Me being here right at this exact moment is the sign that you’re supposed to mail that letter.”

(She gently takes it from me and I let her. I’m speechless, all I can do is wipe my tears.)

Mail Lady: *smiling at me as she leaves* “They’re gonna love you.”

(I went out to my car and cried for ten minutes. Reuniting with my birth family has been an emotional rollercoaster. In five weeks I am going to meet my birth father for the first time. Thank you, Mail Lady, for making all this possible for me… Without you I might never have mailed that letter.)

A Sweet Twist

| ON, Canada | Family & Kids, Language & Words

(A lot of my relatives are not very well off financially, and neither are a lot of people in the neighbourhoods they live in. This happens when one of my little cousins is in kindergarten.)

Teacher: “And what do you want to be when you grow up, [Cousin]?”

Cousin: “A sugar daddy!”

Teacher: “A what?! Oh… Uh… And… why do you want to be that?”

Cousin: “Because there’s lot of poor kids whose parents can’t buy them any candy, so when I grow up, I’ll get rich, and then I’ll buy candy for all the poor kids.”

When Not Always Right Becomes Not Always Hopeless

| USA | Family & Kids, Food & Drink

(My mom hates any service people, even though she claims she doesn’t. She’s always going to stores and making big scenes whether or not she gets her way. We go to a grocery store and she orders some meat. I’m already cringing because the butcher looks exactly the type that she hates. He gives her her wrapped meat and she pays for it.)

Mom: *taking out a dollar* “And here’s a tip. Go get yourself a cup of coffee, my friend.”

Butcher: *nods in thanks and takes money*

Me: *jaw-drop*

Giving Them Paramedical Attention

| USA | Awesome, Family & Kids, Health & Body

(I’m a fifteen-year veteran paramedic. I’ve just come into work to pick up my ambulance and start my shift when my supervisor informs me that I have been scheduled for a meeting with both Human Resources and Quality Assurance the next morning. These meetings are usually a very big deal, meaning that somewhere a policy or procedure in treatment wasn’t followed, and disciplinary action is usually involved. So, not the best news. I spend my shift talking to my paramedic partner about every call we’d run in the month prior, trying to figure out what might have happened, but nothing pops on our radar. Skip to the next morning. I show up for the meeting and everyone is pleasant and there are some people there, with a small infant, that I don’t know.)

Quality Assurance Manager: “[My Name], do you recognize any of these folks?”

Me: “No, sir. I’m afraid I don’t.”

Woman: *holding baby* “My husband and I were involved in a very serious accident three months ago while I was pregnant… a week away from my due date. You and your partner were the first people on scene; they told us later that you drove up, and dove right in without any hesitation whatsoever. You put me onto a helicopter because I was pregnant and sent my husband by ground ambulance to the same hospital so we wouldn’t be separated. After my surgery and emergency C-section I have a healthy me and a healthy, happy child. The trauma doc told us that your decisions on the side of that road saved both me and the baby. Would you like to meet her? I can’t think of any better way to say thank you.”

(I held that darling little girl for the better part of an hour, cooing and feeding her and getting to know her amazing parents. After a round of hugs and many thanks all around, I was absolutely floored that these people had taken the time to hunt us down to say thank you. It doesn’t happen often in my line of work, but the times it does mean so much.)

Full Of Helpful

| Marion, OH, USA | At The Checkout, Family & Kids, Holidays

(I have a birth defect called Phocomelia; my arms are short and I don’t have hands, but I get by decently well. To avoid an extra stress I tend to go to the store late at night or early morning. I go late, as with four shopping days left until Christmas I know I can’t handle the extra large crowds that were made up of people who love to stare. I have gotten good at ignoring those around me unless they are in my way and in line of sight. I was putting my items on the belt and was in my own world. I hear a man and kids talking, but don’t think anything of it, until the two little girls come up to me.)

Older Girl: “Can I help?” *I am thrown off by the question, because it’s usually an adult that asks*

Me: “Sure, thank you!” *the older girl grabs the last of the items in the cart*

Younger Girl: “I didn’t get to help.”

Me: “It’s the thought that counts.” *I feel a little bad; she truly does want to help*

Their Father: “You can help her put the bags in the cart.”

(The father and girls talk, joke, and laugh while I wait to pay for my items. It’s a nice change to hear a parent interacting with the kids and keeping everything light and happy, as all the other parents I see in the store this night ignore or yell at their kids. When my items are being bagged the father tells them to help. I get one bag, the older girl gets another and then helps her little sister with the last bag.)

Me: “Thank you, girls!” *and then I thank the father*

(The father helped renew some of my faith in the future generations. Not only did the girls happily help, but they didn’t stare. They looked a little, but I wouldn’t expect anything less from younger kids. To the father: Thank you so much! I’m used to doing things on my own, but to be offered help when I’m obviously tired and struggling means so much to me, especially after waiting to see if I had things handled or was struggling. And the fact that you are raising your girls to be respectful to others is heartwarming.)

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